Friday, March 25, 2016

Interview with Mystery/Suspense Author Bruce Judisch

                                                                                                              
Bruce Judisch has been writing fiction for many years.  His first work, “A Prophet’s Tale,” is a two-part novelization of the story of the Old Testament prophet, Jonah ben Amittai, comprising The Journey Begun and The Word Fulfilled. A third part, The Promised Kept, is under construction. More recently, he wrote Katia and its sequel For Maria, both with contemporary and 20th-century historical storylines. Please see the next pages for more information on these works. Bruce lives in Texas with his wife and high school sweetheart, Jeannie, and their two Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Charlie and Raleigh.  Bruce and Jeannie are the proud parents of three and grandparents of fourteen.

Welcome back to my blog, Bruce. Please tell us about your new book, Quimby Pond.

Oh, my goodness, was this fun to write! It’s a contemporary mystery/suspense—with a healthy dose of romance—based upon a true historical event.  Let me give you the contemporary storyline (I’ll save the historical hook for the next question.)

Gwen Kelly comes to Marble Falls. Maine, to escape a broken past, a past that revisits her when she begins to restore an antique trunk. A mysterious assailant targets her and her friends, one by one.  Gwen is thrust into an awkward relationship with Officer Brent Newcomb as they race to stop the intruder from striking again. Could the trunk hold the key to this cloud of violence spreading over the peaceful Marble Lakes? If so, will they discover its secret in time? If not, what have they stumbled into?

Where did you get your inspiration for this story?

This is the really cool part. A good friend shared a 19th-century newspaper article she’d found in her aunt’s attic. Here’s the verbatim article:

Rangeley Lakes, Volume 2. Rangeley, Maine. Thursday, August 20, 1896. Number 13.
The center of attraction Thursday was at the railroad station after the arrival of the 1 o’clock train. There came on that train a “bridal trunk,” anyway, one of the cards attached said: “I’m a bride;” another announced, “We are married.” There was a drawing of a loving couple with wedding bells and a cupid. But the happy couple didn’t come. There was a crowd awaiting the train at night, and again they were doomed to disappointment, but they had the pleasure of looking over the trunk just the same.

My goodness, how can an author read an account like this and not write a mystery story? In Quimby Pond, Rangeley becomes the fictional town of Marble Falls. Outlying areas—like Quimby Pond—retain their names for authenticity.

What kind of research did you do for this book?

I received wonderful help from contacts in the Rangeley area—notably through the exceptional Ms. Belinda Mansfield, a Rangeley resident I credit in the Acknowledgments. Additionally, an author who penned the chronological history of the Rangeley Lakes area sent me a complimentary copy of his book. The chair of the History Department at the University of Maine was also very forthcoming with material regarding 19th-century Maine. Most fun, though, was the superb joy of visiting Rangeley, after having written the first draft of the manuscript, for a “boots-on-the-ground” research trip. It was during this journey that I bonded with the beautiful Rangeley Lakes region. If any of your readers is interested in touring New England, Rangeley is a must visit—especially in the autumn, or the winter if they’re snow-sports enthusiasts.

Tell us what you love about your main character?

Who, Gwen? Oh my goodness, what a lady! She has two things going for her. First, her namesake is my fourteenth granddaughter—let there be no mistake about my bias. J  Secondly, I strived to write Gwen outside of the modern Disneyesque profile of heroines abandoning their femininity in favor of “kicking the butt” of any and all male counterparts. Women are blessed God-given beings to the world in all of their strengths and weaknesses, the same as men. In Quimby Pond, Gwen Kelly retains all of her feminine qualities, like grace and charm, but still rises to save the day in more than one instance. If I were unattached and 30 years younger, I would so date Gwen!

Where can my readers find you online?

For now I’m at www.brucejudisch.com; however, I may be changing that soon. Any interested reader will find my work by searching my name at Amazon,com.

Thanks so much for featuring me on your blog, Linda. It’s been fun!

Thank you, Bruce, for talking to us today. I hope my readers will check out your suspenseful story.

38 comments:

Diane Dean White said...

I've never been to Maine, but Bruce's book Quimby Pond is second best.
I was captivated at the beginning of this story with a "bridal trunk" arriving
at the railroad station without anyone to claim it. And a true story from 1896!
I love suspense, romance and mystery, but antiques too. Then to journey with
Gwen, present day, and her restoration of the same trunk, among other antiques,
the story had me glued! Mr. Judisch is an exceptionally good writer, weaving his
craft into a beautifully written book. I know everyone who reads this story will
become intrigued with the area and Quimby Pond. I bought a copy for my husbands
birthday, but had to do a quick read first!! (Linda, please remove my name
from the drawing, I have it!).

Library Lady said...

I enjoy reading books about "found treasures" in an attic, basement, closet, in the walls of a house, etc.
I can only imagine what they would say, if only they could talk.
Janet E.
von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks so much for the kind words, Diane. Hope Steve enjoys the story too. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi, Janet. I share your interest in "hidden treasures." Love musty old attics for their character and possibilities. :-) Thanks for stopping by to comment.

Cheers! Bruce

Edye Nicole said...

Great interview! I've never read any of Bruce's books before, so I'll have to check them out.

Blessings,
Edye

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting, Edye. The story was a lot of fun to write, and I hope it's a lot of fun to read. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

Susan Snodgrass said...

I've never read any of this author's work, but I'd like to be entered to win a copy.

Laura Thomas said...

I love finding old stuff in unexpected places. I collect old books and household items. We used to go in these abandoned houses out in the middle of nowhere and find boxes of old papers and photos. Probably not smart as the houses were falling down, but young and stupid. LOL

Such a lovely cover for your books and it sounds thrilling. It would be wonderful to win a print copy:) Have a wonderful Easter.

jean602 said...

Wonderful interview.I have not read any of the authors books I'll have to read some.

jean602 said...

Wonderful interview.I have not read any of the authors books I'll have to read some.

Justina Prima said...

Hello, Bruce. I can't count how many times Diane has mentioned you during our conversations. Then when your book came out with the location in Maine, she emailed me right away. Every 3rd summer my husband's brother has the family come to a rented house on the beach at Old Orchard. We love Maine and moving there in October.

Research is so important and I look forward to reading your book!

Bruce Judisch said...

Thank you, Laura. And, as with Janet, I share your love of dusty old things. :-) The attic of the house I grew up in was a favorite secret place--so much family history.

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks, Jean. I hope you will. :-) Have a wonderful Easter.

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi Justina!

Diane has mentioned your name too. Wonderful that you stopped in to comment. :-) Great attachment to Maine. I'd only been there one other time (m-a-n-y years ago) on a camping trip at Bar Harbor. Love New England!

Totally agree on the research. It's a favorite aspect of mine in writing. You better not write historicals if you don't like research... ;-)

Have a great Easter weekend.

Cheers! Bruce

Caryl Kane said...

Great interview with Bruce! I love a good mystery! Enjoy your Resurrection Weekend!

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks much, Caryl. (What a great spelling for that name! :-) ) I enjoy a good mystery too. I only hope that you'll consider Quimby Pond to be a "good" mystery once you've read it. :-)

God bless, and a wonderful Resurrection Day to you and yours as well.

Cheers! Bruce

Wayne Lecoy said...

It would be great to win
a copy of the book Quimby Pond by Bruce Judisch.
I enjoyed reading your Interview
and i think this would be a book i would enjoy reading.
I have never heard of Bruce Judisch
before but i like reading mystery books.
Thank you for having this giveaway.

Pam Graber said...

I love that a 19th century newspaper clipping sparked your story! I have always loved a good mystery, starting as a child with The Happy Hollisters mysteries and moving on to Trixie Belden. LOL! Am I dating myself, or what?? Would love to win Quimby Pond.

LouisePledge said...

While I'm not familiar with this author, I love suspense novels, and this one sounds very intriguing!

Sonja said...

Bruce Judisch is an incredible author. I would love to be the recipient of this giveaway!

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks for commenting, Wayne. I wish you the best in the drawing. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi Pam,

Historical hooks are the best. :-) So much fun to see what you can do with obscure events from the past.

Best of luck in the drawing.

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks for stopping by to comment, Louise. I hope you'll get the chance to enjoy the story. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi Sonja!

Great to hear from you, and thanks so much for the kind words. Trust all is well with you and yours. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

LAWonder said...

This sounds fantastic! I love mystery. and I love books based on facts!
Thank you for the interview and the oportunity to win.

sweetpea35 said...

I really enjoyed the interview. This looks like a great book and I'd love to win!

Vera Godley said...

I "discovered" Bruce and his book set in Maine on Lena's blog and entered that giveaway. Then I saw his Facebook link and looked to see more about this intriguing author. There he invites his FB readers to visit your blog/interview and enter this giveaway. Double treat for me! Two sories into his author-thinking and learning a bit about him and his book. Loved it. So please enter me in your giveaway, too. I'd love to read Bruce's book.

Also, Bruce. I have 13 grandchildren and 1 GREAT-grandchild.

Vera

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi LA -

Thanks for commenting and your interest in my writing. Wish you best of luck in the drawing. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi Sweetpea!

Thanks for the comment. And hope you win the opportunity to enjoy the story. :-)

Cheers! Bruce

Bruce Judisch said...

Hi Vera!

Thanks so much for tracking me down. And isn't grandparenthood a hoot? :-) We had three kids and they rewarded us with 14 grandkids. It may be a while before that first great-grand though.

Wish you the best in the drawing.

Cheers! Bruce

Jeanna Massman said...

What an interesting plot. I love that it's a combination of mystery and romance with historical slant.

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks, Jeanna. It was fun to develop the plot from the historical hook. The romance was also fun to write, but an undercurrent of the storyline.

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Cheers! Bruce

Melanie Backus said...

Thank you for a great interview. I am intrigued by this one!

mauback55 at gmail dot com

Bruce Judisch said...

Thanks, Melanie. The historical hook was quite a gem to stumble upon, and the story a lot of fun to write.

Cheers! Bruce

Linda Weaver Clarke said...

Congratulations to Laura Thomas. You are the winner of this intriguing novel. I know you'll enjoy it.

Bruce Judisch said...

Congrats, Laura! If you can send a snail mail address to me at bjudisch@satx.rr.com, I'll get your book posted soonest.

Cheers! Bruce

Linda Weaver Clarke said...

Congratulations to Vera. You are a winner for Bruce's book. I know you'll enjoy it very much.

Vera Godley said...

Much appreciation for the "win" and I look forward to receiving the book. Great blog post and Q&A with Bruce. His book really interests me.